Department Calendar

April 2017

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The Irish and the Jews

The Irish and the Jews

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 4:00pm
Location: 
Rare Book and Manuscript Library, 6th Floor, East Butler Library
Event Category: 
Talks

Apr 4 - The Irish and the Jews exhibition open house 4-5 P.M. followed in Butler Library 523 at 5 P.M. by a talk by Pol O Dochartaigh and reading by Ruth Gilligan with an introduction by James Shapiro

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04/04/2017 - 4:00pm
 
 
 
 
 
 
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"About Abortion," Carol Sanger at Book Culture

"About Abortion," Carol Sanger at Book Culture

Tuesday, April 11, 2017 - 7:30pm
Location: 
536 West 112th Street (between Amsterdam and Broadway)
Event Category: 
Talks

You are invited to join us on Tuesday, April 11th at 7:30 P.M. at Book Culture for a discussion by Carol Sanger on her newest book, About Abortion. Joining Carol in an intriguing interdisciplinary discussion among scholars of law, history and literature are Stephanie McCurry and Jean Howard. 

​Carol Sanger is the Barbara Aronstein Black Professor of Law at Columbia Law School.

Stephanie McCurry is the R. Gordon Hoxie Professor of American History in Honor of Dwight D. Eisenhower at Columbia University.

Jean Howard is the George Delacorte Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University.

                       

 

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04/11/2017 - 7:30pm
 
 
 
"Nerve poetry and Fiber Art: Biosemiosis and Erasmus Darwin," Amanda Jo Goldstein (Cornell)

"Nerve poetry and Fiber Art: Biosemiosis and Erasmus Darwin," Amanda Jo Goldstein (Cornell)

Friday, April 14, 2017 - 5:00pm
Location: 
Hamilton 516
Event Category: 
Talks

Apr 14 - The talk unfolds the critical genealogy of the new biological discourses of epigenetics, neural plasticity, and biosemiotics through their forgotten precedents in Enlightenment and Romantic neuroscience and poetics. It revives Erasmus Darwin’s pioneering theory of the animal nervous system to focus on his genre of didactic poetry as a neurologically informed pedagogical program. Rejecting the ethics, politics, and pertinence of an ideal of human freedom as freedom from every extrinsic and natural determination, the talk discovers in the deep history of epigenetic neuroscience an earlier modern sense of “plasticity” that grasped biotic matter as teachable down to the first nerve. Darwin’s under-appreciated form of didactic poetry knew how to exploit this kind of educable corporeality – and might have something to teach us about how to comport with our physical and cognitive plasticity.

Amanda Jo Goldstein is Assistant Professor of English at Cornell University. She works on European Romanticism and the life sciences, with special interest in rhetoric and figuration, pre-Darwinian biology, and materialist theories of history, poetry, and nature. Her first book is Sweet Science: Romantic Materialism and the New Sciences of Life (University of Chicago Press, forthcoming in May 2017)

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04/14/2017 - 5:00pm
 
 
 
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"The Art of Love Poetry," Erik Gray

"The Art of Love Poetry," Erik Gray

Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 12:00pm
Location: 
Heyman Center Common Room
Event Category: 
Books

Apr 19 - ​Professor Erik Gray will be giving a Works-in-Progress talk entitled "The Art of Love Poetry" on Wednesday, April 19 in the Heyman Center Common Room, 12-1:30 P.M.

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04/19/2017 - 12:00pm
 
 
04/21/2017 - 10:00am
 
 
 
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"Atlantic Aesthetics: François Makandal, Fetishes, and the Sensorium," Monique Allewaert (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

"Atlantic Aesthetics: François Makandal, Fetishes, and the Sensorium," Monique Allewaert (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Tuesday, April 25, 2017 - 6:00pm
Location: 
516 Hamilton
Event Category: 
Talks

The talk discusses the African-born slave-turned-maroon François Makandal as well as the mythologies that have swirled around him from the eighteenth century till today, particularly those linked to his prophecy that he would become a fly to avoid capture by colonial authorities. The author focuses on how this prophecy of becoming-insect links up to the practice of fetishism for which he was executed, following out what this means for how we think aesthetics in the plantation zone. Monique Allewaert is Associate Professor of Early American Literature at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is the author of Ariel’s Ecology: Plantations, Personhood, and Colonialism in the American Tropics, 1760-1820 (University of Minnesota Press, 2013).

 

Preview attachment monique allewaert poster-CU.pdf

 

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04/25/2017 - 6:00pm
 
 
 
 
 
 
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