Events

Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 7:00pm
East Gallery, Buell Hall, Columbia University, West 116th Street and Broadway

Nov 29 - Prof. Brent Edwards will give a talk on Ornette Coleman and the "loft jazz" scene in downtown Manhattan.
Tuesday, December 6, 2016 - 6:00pm
302 Philosophy

Dec 6 - This presentation addresses the tragic, Vodou imaginary that orients the representations of the Haitian Revolution in Edwidge Danticat’s short stories, “Nineteen Thirty Seven” and “Wall of Rising Fire.”
Wednesday, December 7, 2016 - 7:00pm
Heyman Center 2nd Floor

Dec 10 - Mark your calendars for "Leonard Cohen: a retrospective” on December 7th, 7-9pm — a roundtable at the Heyman Center featuring our own Austin Graham, as well as Mason Golden and Austin Vishio with views from musicology. Next we'll play Cohen’s songs and read his poetry — write to me with your suggestions. Leonard Cohen was once a Columbia English graduate student, and I hope many of you can attend at least some of the evening.

Friday, February 10, 2017 - 3:00pm
302 Philosophy

Feb 10 - The Nineteenth Century Colloquium will be hosting a talk from John Plotz (Brandeis University) titled "World Without Us: The Problem of the Nonhuman in the Fantasy of William Morris." All are welcome.
Thursday, February 16, 2017 - 7:00pm
Book Culture - 536 W 112th St

Feb 15 - Join us at 7pm for a reading and discussion of Amiable with Big Teeth, a newly discovered novel by Claude McKay, edited with an introduction by Jean-Christophe Cloutier and Brent Hayes Edwards.
 
A monumental literary event: the newly discovered final novel by seminal H
Friday, February 17, 2017 - 4:00pm
Butler 203

Feb 17 - This talk considers Claudia Rankine's depictions of Serena Williams and Zinedine Zidane in her latest poetry collection, Citizen: An American Lyric alongside Marvel Comics recent reconceptualization of Captain America to illuminate the ways that exceptional citizenship extends to those racial minorities that purportedly represent the noblest ideals of the state.

Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 4:00pm
CSER Seminar Room, 420 Hamilton Hall

Feb 22 - Laying out large-scale framing questions for a new project, “Networked Solitude” asks what relevance acts of solitude in American literature and culture from the 19th century to the present—with their ancient and modern tributaries, from Buddhist, Christian, psychological, poetic, disciplinary, and social-theoretical sources—have for our conception of social life. The talk proposes that in transforming our understanding of what it at stake in the archives of solitude that we may reopen older questions about exactly how and to what end human acts of imagination have their effects.

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