Department Calendar

February 2019

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Finding the Way to Truth: Sources, History, and Impact of the Meditative Tradition

Finding the Way to Truth: Sources, History, and Impact of the Meditative Tradition

Saturday, February 2, 2019 - 9:00am
Location: 
Maison Française East Gallery, Buell Hall
Event Category: 
Talks

How is the ancient exhortation to “know thyself” related to consolation, virtue, and the study of nature? How did the commitment to self-knowledge shift over the centuries in writings by Islamic, Jewish, Christian, and early modern natural philosophers? How did medieval women contribute to modern notions of self, self-knowledge, and knowledge of nature? This conference explores the meditative “reflective methodology” from its ancient roots, through medieval Christian, Muslim, and Jewish traditions to the so-called “new” methodologies of early modern science. Speakers include Souleymane Bachir Diagne, Pierre Force, Clémence Boulouque, Christia Mercer, and Pamela Smith.  

Points of focus will be: (1) the relation between the ancient imperative to “know thyself” and medieval concerns to reflect on one's self as a means to find ultimate truths; (2) the meditative genre as it developed from Augustine’s Confessions through Christian and Islamic spiritual exercises to late medieval Christian meditations and early modern kabbalist writings; (3) the continuity between medieval meditations and the reflective methodology of early modern science; and (4) the meditative genre’s afterlife in Freud, Foucault, Arendt, and contemporary science.

Conference co-sponsored by the Center for New Narratives in Philosophy, the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy, the Departments of Philosophy, French, English and Comparative Literature and the Maison Française

http://maisonfrancaise.org/finding-the-way-to-truth-sources-history-and-impact-of-the-meditative-tradition

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02/02/2019 - 9:00am
 
 
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BODILY: The Immigrant Body in the Court of Judgment -- with Amitava Kumar

BODILY: The Immigrant Body in the Court of Judgment -- with Amitava Kumar

Thursday, February 7, 2019 - 4:00pm
Location: 
Heyman Center, second floor common room
Event Category: 
Talks

Please join us this Thursday, February 7th for BODILY: The Immigrant Body in the Court of Judgment with Amitava Kumar. Dr. Amitava Kumar will read from, and discuss, his recent novel Immigrant, Montana. One of The New Yorker's Best Books of 2018 and a New York Times Notable Book of 2018, the novel follows the protagonist Kailash on his American dream from a village in India to graduate school in New York, and focuses on the intersections of the sexual and the political.

Dr. Bruce Robbins, Old Dominion Foundation Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University, will offer a brief response and then be in conversation with Dr. Kumar.

This event is cosponsored by the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society, the Institute for Religion, Culture & Public Life, Department of English and Comparative Literature, and The Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities.

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02/07/2019 - 4:00pm
 
International Conference on Protection and Accountability in Burma

International Conference on Protection and Accountability in Burma

Friday, February 8, 2019 - 9:00am
Location: 
Barnard Hall, James Room, 4th Floor New York, NY 10027
Event Category: 
Conferences

Come hear renowned scholars of genocide, post-colonial studies, and law, global activists, UN officials, & political leaders, as well as Myanmar's victims of what UN calls "gravest crimes in international law" (genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes). See the full program (draft) here.

This conference is designed to call world’s attention to and educate the international public at large about the twofold need for protection and accountability which Rohingya genocide survivors and other ethnic and religious minorities such as Kachin, Shan, Karen, Myanmar Muslims, etc. demand and deserve.

Those arriving late must wait to be seated and may forfeit their ticket to waitlisted individuals.

Please contact ColumbiaBurmaConference@gmail.com for questions, comments and inquiries related to the conference.

For more information and to register:

 
Livestreaming via https://totalwebcasting.com/view/?func=VOFF&id=barnard&date=2019-02-08&seq=1
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02/08/2019 - 9:00am
 
International Conference on Protection and Accountability in Burma

International Conference on Protection and Accountability in Burma

Saturday, February 9, 2019 - 9:00am
Location: 
Barnard Hall, James Room, 4th Floor New York, NY 10027
Event Category: 
Talks

Come hear renowned scholars of genocide, post-colonial studies, and law, global activists, UN officials, & political leaders, as well as Myanmar's victims of what UN calls "gravest crimes in international law" (genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes). See the full program (draft) here.

This conference is designed to call world’s attention to and educate the international public at large about the twofold need for protection and accountability which Rohingya genocide survivors and other ethnic and religious minorities such as Kachin, Shan, Karen, Myanmar Muslims, etc. demand and deserve.

Those arriving late must wait to be seated and may forfeit their ticket to waitlisted individuals.

Please contact ColumbiaBurmaConference@gmail.com for questions, comments and inquiries related to the conference.

For more information and to register:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-international-conference-on-protection-and-accountability-in-burma-registration-54532756944?aff=affiliate1

Livestreaming via https://totalwebcasting.com/view/?func=VOFF&id=barnard&date=2019-02-08&seq=1

 

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02/09/2019 - 9:00am
 
 
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"Kissing the Book: Copyright, Slavery, and the Making of (Black) Literary Properties," Joseph Slaughter at NYU

"Kissing the Book: Copyright, Slavery, and the Making of (Black) Literary Properties," Joseph Slaughter at NYU

Thursday, February 21, 2019 - 6:00pm
Location: 
19 University Place, Room 222 (NYU)
Event Category: 
Talks

Feb 21 - Joseph Slaughter (Columbia U) will be speaking in the Comparative Approaches to the Literatures of Africa, the Middle East, and the Global South lecture series at NYU on Thursday, February 21st @ 6pm. 19 University Place, Room 222.

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02/21/2019 - 6:00pm
 
LGBTQ Roundtable for Graduate Students with Columbia Faculty

LGBTQ Roundtable for Graduate Students with Columbia Faculty

Thursday, February 21, 2019 - 6:00pm
Location: 
Columbia Law School, Case Lounge, 7th floor
Event Category: 
Talks

The LGBTQ Roundtable and dinner this Thursday is part of University Life's Graduate Initiative for Inclusion and Engagement's Diversity, Dialogue and Dinner Series and features an exciting panel of Columbia faculty from across the University.  The inaugural dinner last semester featured first-generation faculty; other dinners are being planned for later this spring.  Just below is information about another Graduate Initiative event on Wednesday evening - part of the Success Workshop series - On Great Terms: Job Negotiations Done Right, featuring Business School professor Daniel Ames. For more on all aspects of the Graduate Initiative, please see https://universitylife.columbia.edu/graduate-initiative.
Many thanks, Suzanne
 
LGBTQ Roundtable for Graduate Students with Columbia Faculty 
Thursday, February 21, 6-8 p.m.
Join Columbia faculty members for a discussion on experiences in higher education as members of the LGBTQ community.
The discussion will feature:
  • Patrick Wilson, Associate Professor of Sociomedical Studies
  • Frances Negron-Muntaner, Professor of English and Comparative Literature
  • Shamus Khan, Chair and Professor of Sociology
  • Tonda L. Hughes, Henrik H. Bendixen Professor of International Nursing
  • Jack Halberstam, Professor of English and Gender Studies
  • Suzanne Goldberg, EVP for University Life, Herbert and Doris Wechsler Professor of Law (moderator)
Co-sponsored by the Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty Diversity and Inclusion.

Dinner will be served. Please bring your CUID. Register here:  https://universitylife.columbia.edu/LGBTQRoundtable

 
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02/21/2019 - 6:00pm
 
 
 
 
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"Literary Machines: Chatbots and Story Generators of the 1950s-70s," Dennis Tenen

"Literary Machines: Chatbots and Story Generators of the 1950s-70s," Dennis Tenen

Thursday, February 28, 2019 - 1:00pm
Location: 
754 Schermerhorn Extension
Event Category: 
Talks

Feb 28 - The perspective of labor, as projected through an archive in the history of literary automation, challenges several commonly-held academic truisms. The accepted historiography views early computational experiments with generative text as part of a radical avant-garde, related to contemporary developments in counter-cultural movements such as Dada, OULIPO, and Concrete Poetry. This genealogy is well documented, but incomplete. Automation in every field of human activity was related also to the market-driven, commercial enterprise with a mandate to improve efficiency. In this way, Joseph Weizenbaum’s iconic ELIZA—a computer program developed in the 1960s to mimic conversations with a Rogerian psychotherapist—was paralleled at the University of Wisconsin hospital system in the implementation of LINC—Laboratory Instrument Computer, a Skinnerian terminal designed to interview gynecologists.The tales told by TALESPIN, one of the most sophisticated story generators of the period, found their way not to a book store, but to Boeing Corporation, which used it to generate narrative reports based on aviation accident data collected from its planes’ sensors. And the generative grammars tested on folk tales were funded by the United States military, which had a long-term interest in using them in the development of weapon systems. If early experiments with computer-generated art were subversive they were also an integral part of a research program into a new kind of a synthetic literature, radical in the kinds of reading and writing publics it would engender.

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02/28/2019 - 1:00pm
 
Queer Disruptions III

Queer Disruptions III

Thursday, February 28, 2019 - 3:00pm
Location: 
The Forum, 601 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027
Event Category: 
Conferences

This will be the third year of Queer Disruptions (QD3), and this year an international slate of esteemed scholars, activists, and artists will convene to celebrate GLQ’s 25th anniversary and to reflect on the seminal conference Black Nations/Queer Nations from 1995.

This program is hosted by the Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies Council at Columbia University in the City of New York and sponsored by the Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty Diversity and Inclusion.

Additional support provided by the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality, the Center for Gender and Sexuality Law at Columbia Law School, the Center for the Study of Social Difference, the Barnard Center for Research on Women, and the Program for the Study of LGBT Health.

Registration is required.

REGISTER HERE

 

CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Pre-Conference Programming (Feb 27, 2019)

 

Here and Queer in Networked Space: A conversation with Zach Stafford and Jack Halberstam
moderated by Mark Hansen
5:00-6:30 pm
Brown Institute for Media Innovation, Pulitzer Hall (Ground floor), 2950 Broadway, New York, NY 10027

 

Ana Maria Romano Concert and Discussion
Free and Open to the Public
7:30pm (doors at 7:15)
Katharina Otto-Bernstein Screening Room, Lenfest Center for the Arts, 615 West 129th Street, between Broadway and 12th Avenue

 


Thursday, Feb 28, 2019
The Forum, 601 West 125th Street, New York, NY  10027

3pm-4pm
Registration/Badge Pick Up

 

4pm-6pm
Black Nations/Queer Nations

Kendall Thomas (Columbia Law School), moderator
Cathy Cohen (University of Chicago)
Chandan Reddy (University of Washington)
Rinaldo Walcott (University of Toronto)
M. Jacqui Alexander (University of Toronto)


 


Friday, March 1, 2019
The Forum, 601 West 125th Street, New York, NY  10027

 

9am-10am
Registration/Badge Pick Up

 

10am-11:30am
NYC Queer History and Theory

Tey Meadow (Columbia University), moderator
Kenyon Farrow (Independent Writer/Activist)
Katherine Franke (Columbia Law School)
George Chauncey (Columbia University)

 

1pm-2:30pm
Queer Art/Queer Theory

Tavia Nyong’o (Yale University), moderator
Iván Ramos (University of Maryland, College Park)
Xandra Ibarra (Independent Artist)
Kara Keeling (University of Chicago)

 

3pm-4:30pm
Queer/Trans Intersections

Vanessa Agard-Jones (Columbia University), moderator
Marquis Bey (Cornell University)
Dora Silva Santana (John Jay College – CUNY)
Aren Aizura (University of Minnesota)
boychild (Independent Artist)

 


Closing Performance (March 1, 2019)
KGB Bar, The Red Room: 85 E 4th St, New York, NY 10003

 

8:30pm-10:30pm
Trans/gression: An Evening of Performance
Curated by Kiyan Williams
Performances by Linda Labeija and NIC Kay

 

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02/28/2019 - 3:00pm
 
 
 
 
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