Courses

Spring 2019

UNIVERSITY WRITING

, 3 pts, UN1010

UW: CONTEMPORARY ESSAYS

Section Number
001
Call Number
11586
Day, Time & Location
MW 8:40AM-9:55AM 201B Philosophy Hall
Instructor
Daniella Cadiz Bedini

UW: CONTEMPORARY ESSAYS

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 069). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields.  UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Film and Performing Arts (sections in the 300s). Features essays that analyze a particular artistic medium (music, theater, film, photography...). UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Section Number
008
Call Number
69452
Day, Time & Location
MW 11:40AM-12:55PM 652 Schermerhorn Hall [SCH]
Instructor
Buck Wanner

UW: CONTEMPORARY ESSAYS

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 069). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields.  UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Film and Performing Arts (sections in the 300s). Features essays that analyze a particular artistic medium (music, theater, film, photography...). UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Section Number
010
Call Number
26732
Day, Time & Location
MW 1:10PM-2:25PM 201B Philosophy Hall
Instructor
Katherine R Mcintyre

UW: CONTEMPORARY ESSAYS

Section Number
015
Call Number
69041
Day, Time & Location
MW 2:40PM-3:55PM 201B Philosophy Hall
Instructor
Adam T Horn

UW: CONTEMPORARY ESSAYS

Section Number
017
Call Number
22359
Day, Time & Location
TR 2:40PM-3:55PM 201B Philosophy Hall
Instructor
Adam C Winters

UW: CONTEMPORARY ESSAYS

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 069). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields.  UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Film and Performing Arts (sections in the 300s). Features essays that analyze a particular artistic medium (music, theater, film, photography...). UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Section Number
018
Call Number
76556
Day, Time & Location
MW 4:10PM-5:25PM 201B Philosophy Hall
Instructor
Rebecca Sonkin

UW: CONTEMPORARY ESSAYS

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 069). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields.  UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Film and Performing Arts (sections in the 300s). Features essays that analyze a particular artistic medium (music, theater, film, photography...). UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Section Number
021
Call Number
17664
Day, Time & Location
MW 5:40PM-6:55PM 201B Philosophy Hall
Instructor
David M Jamieson

UW: CONTEMPORARY ESSAYS

Section Number
023
Call Number
25265
Day, Time & Location
TR 5:40PM-6:55PM To be announced
Instructor
Synne Borgen

UW: CONTEMPORARY ESSAYS

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 069). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields.  UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Film and Performing Arts (sections in the 300s). Features essays that analyze a particular artistic medium (music, theater, film, photography...). UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Section Number
024
Call Number
20432
Day, Time & Location
TR 5:40PM-6:55PM 502 Northwest Corner Building
Instructor
Justin B Snider

UW: CONTEMPORARY ESSAYS

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 069). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields.  UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Film and Performing Arts (sections in the 300s). Features essays that analyze a particular artistic medium (music, theater, film, photography...). UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Section Number
026
Call Number
70499
Day, Time & Location
TR 7:10PM-8:25PM 201B Philosophy Hall
Instructor
Theresa R Jefferson

UW: READINGS IN AMER STUD

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 069). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields.  UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Film and Performing Arts (sections in the 300s). Features essays that analyze a particular artistic medium (music, theater, film, photography...). UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Section Number
119
Call Number
20864
Day, Time & Location
TR 4:10PM-5:25PM 201D Philosophy Hall
Instructor
Allen C Durgin

UW: READINGS-GENDER & SEX

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 069). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields.  UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Film and Performing Arts (sections in the 300s). Features essays that analyze a particular artistic medium (music, theater, film, photography...). UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Section Number
213
Call Number
70856
Day, Time & Location
TR 1:10PM-2:25PM 423 Kent Hall
Instructor
Glenn M Gordon

UW: READINGS-GENDER & SEX

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 069). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields.  UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Film and Performing Arts (sections in the 300s). Features essays that analyze a particular artistic medium (music, theater, film, photography...). UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Section Number
225
Call Number
29425
Day, Time & Location
MW 7:10PM-8:25PM 201B Philosophy Hall
Instructor
Jack G Lowery

UW: PERFORMANCE ARTS

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 069). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields.  UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Film and Performing Arts (sections in the 300s). Features essays that analyze a particular artistic medium (music, theater, film, photography...). UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Section Number
304
Call Number
67951
Day, Time & Location
TR 10:10AM-11:25AM 201B Philosophy Hall
Instructor
Allaire R Conte

UW: PERFORMANCE ARTS

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 069). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields.  UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Film and Performing Arts (sections in the 300s). Features essays that analyze a particular artistic medium (music, theater, film, photography...). UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Section Number
309
Call Number
19207
Day, Time & Location
MW 1:10PM-2:25PM 307 Mathematics Building
Instructor
Simon L Porzak

UW: PERFORMANCE ARTS

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 069). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields.  UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Film and Performing Arts (sections in the 300s). Features essays that analyze a particular artistic medium (music, theater, film, photography...). UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Section Number
312
Call Number
74168
Day, Time & Location
TR 1:10PM-2:25PM 502 Northwest Corner Building
Instructor
Milan T Terlunen

UW: READINGS IN HUMAN RIG

Section Number
403
Call Number
75155
Day, Time & Location
MW 10:10AM-11:25AM 201B Philosophy Hall
Instructor
Rebecca Wisor

UW: READINGS IN HUMAN RIG

Section Number
407
Call Number
22516
Day, Time & Location
TR 11:40AM-12:55PM To be announced
Instructor
Ameya Tripathi

UW: CONTEMPORARY ESSAYS

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 069). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields.  UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Film and Performing Arts (sections in the 300s). Features essays that analyze a particular artistic medium (music, theater, film, photography...). UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Section Number
502
Call Number
24886
Day, Time & Location
TR 8:40AM-9:55AM 201B Philosophy Hall
Instructor
Charlee C Dyroff

UW: READINGS-MEDICAL HUMA

Section Number
605
Call Number
63368
Day, Time & Location
MW 11:40AM-12:55PM 201D Philosophy Hall
Instructor
Shelby R Wardlaw

UW: READINGS-MEDICAL HUMA

University Writing helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices. University Writing offers the following themed sections, all of which welcome students with no prior experience studying the theme. Students interested in a particular theme should register for the section within the specified range of section numbers. UW: Contemporary Essays (sections from 001 to 069). Features contemporary essays from a variety of fields.  UW: Readings in American Studies (sections in the 100s). Features essays that explore the culture, history, and politics that form American identity. UW: Readings in Gender and Sexuality (sections in the 200s). Features essays that examine relationships among sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other forms of identity. UW: Readings in Film and Performing Arts (sections in the 300s). Features essays that analyze a particular artistic medium (music, theater, film, photography...). UW: Readings in Human Rights (sections in the 400s). Features essays that investigate the ethics of belonging to a community and issues of personhood, identity, representation, and action. UW: Readings in Data Sciences (sections in the 500s). Features essays that study how our data-saturated society challenges conceptions of cognition, autonomy, identity, and privacy. UW: Readings in Medical-Humanities (sections in the 600s). Features essays that explore the disciplines of biomedical ethics and medical anthropology, to challenge our basic assumptions about medicine, care, sickness, and health. University Writing for International Students (sections in the 900s). Open only to international students, these sections emphasize the transition to American academic writing cultures through the study of contemporary essays from a variety of fields. For further details about these classes, please visit: http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/uwp.

Section Number
616
Call Number
74322
Day, Time & Location
TR 2:40PM-3:55PM 201D Philosophy Hall
Instructor
Avia Tadmor

UW: LAW & JUSTICE

Section Number
714
Call Number
76979
Day, Time & Location
MW 2:40PM-3:55PM 201D Philosophy Hall
Instructor
Valerie S Jacobs

UW: LAW & JUSTICE

Section Number
720
Call Number
28958
Day, Time & Location
MW 5:40PM-6:55PM 201D Philosophy Hall
Instructor
Elleza C Kelley

UW FOR INTERNATIONAL STUD

Section Number
906
Call Number
28230
Day, Time & Location
TR 11:40AM-12:55PM To be announced
Instructor
Vanessa D Guida

UW FOR INTERNATIONAL STUD

Section Number
911
Call Number
70833
Day, Time & Location
TR 1:10PM-2:25PM 201B Philosophy Hall
Instructor
Anya A Lewis-Meeks

UW FOR INTERNATIONAL STUD

Section Number
922
Call Number
72336
Day, Time & Location
TR 5:40PM-6:55PM 408A Philosophy Hall
Instructor
Yea Jung Park